Accommodating culture and cultural diversity in online teaching dating in finland

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System change will take time, persistence and patience, but cultural competence at the system level will result in improved health outcomes and greater satisfaction for patients and providers (Walker, 1996).

Understanding cultural diversity will also lead to a greater acceptability of health care practices by other providers.

As the comments in the previous section imply, accommodating to cultural diversity involves more than adding cultural content to the curriculum—more than celebrating Mexican holidays in an American social studies class, for example, and more than discussing the history of slavery of African-Americans.

These are useful actions, but they are only a starting point for truly education (Banks, 2009).

century, the familiar biomedical health care "culture" must accommodate not only persons from diverse cultures, but also diverse systems of care.

For perhaps the first time in over a century, biomedicine must accommodate others rather than require them to assimilate into its "culture." This fundamental shift requires nurses to move quickly to develop cultural competency as individuals and to provide leadership for this system-wide change. Available: Menu Categories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/Tableof Contents/Volume62001/No2May01/Nursing Care Key words: cultural competency, cultural diversity, health care outcomes, web site resources and diversity, print resources and diversity, culture and religious differences in health care, delivery of culturally competent nursing care, biomedicine and cultural diversity, complementary and alternative health care practices, nursing leadership in diversity Introduction Nurses currently work within health care systems that reflect biomedical philosophy and practices.

In studying the “Westward Movement” (the settlement of the American west), for example, it is important to point out that this movement was “westward” only from the point of view of the white Americans living in the eastern United States.

By allowing for various styles of learning, teachers can accommodate a wide range of students, whatever their cultural backgrounds, and whatever cultural background the teacher herself may have.

And flexibility has an added advantage: by honoring students’ individuality, it avoids the danger of stereotyping students’ learning needs on the basis of their cultural background.

Culturally relevant pedagogy can also be found in the literature as “culturally appropriate” (Au & Jordan, 1981), “culturally congruent” (Mohatt & Erickson, 1981), “culturally responsive” (Au, 2009; Cazden & Leggett, 1981; Erickson & Mohatt, 1982; Lee, 1998), and “culturally compatible” (Jordan, 1985; Vogt, Jordan & Tharp, 1987).

Ladson-Billings (1992) also provides some clarification between critical and culturally relevant pedagogy, with the difference being that culturally relevant pedagogy urges collective action grounded in cultural understanding, experiences, and ways of knowing the world. Department of Education's Equity Assistance Centers, such as the Equity Alliance at ASU help states, school districts and schools to establish the conditions for equitable educational outcomes for all students, using cultural responsiveness as one of the measures of the needed capabilities of teachers, principals and school communities as a whole.

It could be something as simple as a run away script or learning how to better use E-utilities, for more efficient work such that your work does not impact the ability of other researchers to also use our site.

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