Copeland spode dating date marks

Josiah Spode established a pottery at Stoke-on-Trent, England, in 1770.

In 1833, the firm was purchased by William Copeland and Thomas Garrett and the mark was changed to . Copeland & Sons continued until a 1976 merger when it became Royal Worcester Spode.

The Great Temple of Diana The Statue of Jupiter Olympus (see image)The Mausoleum of Halicarnassus The Colossus of Rhodes The Pyramids of Egypt The Walls and Hanging Gardens of Babylon The Pharos of Alexandria The pattern was produced with an assortment of borders and on different shapes The plain prints (patterns in one colour) did not have pattern numbers.

These marks are divided into four main categories, including early Spode from 1770 to 1833, Copeland & Garrett from 1833 to 1847, WT Copeland from 1847 to 1970 and Spode from 1970 to 2014.His early products comprised earthenwares such as creamware (a fine cream-coloured earthenware) and pearlware (a fine earthenware with a bluish glaze) as well as a range of stonewares including black basalt, caneware, and jasper which had been popularised by Josiah Wedgwood.The history and products of the Spode factory have inspired generations of historians and collectors, and a useful interactive online exhibition was launched in October 2010.From around 1800, most of the patterns painted by Spode's artists were recorded in Pattern books.These books contain watercolour paintings of tens of thousands of patterns made from about 1800 up to the end of production at the Church Street factory.In 1847, Copeland became the sole owner and the mark changed again. The company was bought by the Portmeirion Group in 2009.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!