Dating for people with mental health problems

I was checking out a guy’s profile on a dating site. If you’ve never had any mental illness, who wants to date a crazy person?

He was nerdy, clean-cut, and very easy on the eyes. Many people think of mental illness in extremes and stereotypes, i.e., depressed people never get out of bed or those with OCD will never leave the bathroom.

Funnily enough this is not because February is a month in which humans feel the need to celebrate the life giving aortic pump caged within our ribs (or in the hands of a rather terrifying and possibly murderous teddy bear), all this heart shaped nonsense is because tomorrow is Valentine’s day.

Personally I have never understood why you should need a holiday to remind you to let your partner know that you love them, but I suppose it is better to have a day dedicated to love than something horrible like punching puppies in the face.

For a start, there is the casual prejudice of terms such as 'psycho' and 'mental' being bandied around when cracking dating jokes with friends.

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They persuaded me to stop taking my tablets and, of course, I quickly became unwell. I started to suffer symptoms of psychosis - paranoid thoughts, and obsessions - in 2001.Lynne had someone to spend Christmas and New Year's with this year. "It's been a long time since I've been with anybody for the holidays," the 50-year-old Albuquerque native said recently."That was different." Many people find dating stressful.The site — True — was launched last year by an Albuquerque social worker to help people like Lynne find healthy relationships. "The Web site, because it caters to people with mental illness, you go in knowing that up front," Lynne said. You don't feel threatened by what the other person might think." Lynne was married once, briefly.• Click here for FOXNews.com's Personal Technology Center. But relationships were more likely to aggravate her mental problems than improve them.It's a bit like diabetes: if I keep taking the tablets, I'm fine. I have friends who know about my diagnosis, and some colleagues who presumably don't (although these days if you Google my name, you find the articles I have written about my mental health).

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