Iron dating

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Around 1850, cast iron furniture for indoor use was introduced.

The idea of a ceremony for the Obligation of Canadian Engineers dates back to 1922, when seven past-presidents of the Engineering Institute of Canada attended a meeting in Montreal with other engineers.

It was logical that the same technology that was already yielding elaborate columns and fences could also be used to mass-produce furnishings for the home.

Individual furniture parts were turned out from molds, then assembled and bolted together into completed pieces.

Most had al strong vertical and horizontal emphasis; some had fancy scrollwork. Cast- and wrought-iron and taper brass tubing; after about 1860, brass-plated steel.

Knobs and other ornament sometimes solid cast brass. FINISHES Brass was polished; iron was painted or lacquered. Perennially popular and increasingly scarce, though only immensely valuable if all-brass and of complex design.

In the Shona language "Zimbabwe" means "stone houses" or "venerated houses"; the residents of Great Zimbabwe are considered the ancestors of the Shona people.

Other bog bodies also had their hair cut when they were killed. One of them suffered a large chest wound, and his intestines spilled out when he was laid in his grave. She interpreted Rendsw├╝hren Man as a murder victim.

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Built between the 11th and 15th centuries, Great Zimbabwe was capital of the Zimbabwe kingdom, cattle-herders and adept iron workers.

The ruins are the largest of their kind on the Zimbabwe Plateau, but they are by no means unique.

Price was largely dictated by the amount of brass in the construction, the cheapest being all iron or iron with brass knobs and end-rails, the most expensive all brass. were in Birmingham, most notably Peyton & Harlow and R. Straightforward double-ended beds without drapery were increasingly common after 1875.

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